Lifestyle & culture

When it comes to work-life balance, Tipperary has few rivals. Those who come to live in Tipperary tend not to leave and it’s easy know why. Tipperary scores particularly high in affordability, with an average house value way below the national average. It’s not just affordability that makes living in Tipperary a lot of sense; work commute times
are low, there’s immediate access to the best education options, from pre-school right up to universities, while the County excels in extracurricular activities – sports, culture, you name it.

A place steeped
in sporting heritage

In sporting terms, Tipperary’s heritage is without equal. The town
of Thurles – complete today with a 53,000 capacity stadium – was
in 1884 the birthplace of the Gaelic Athletic Association, Ireland’s largest sporting organisation and one of the great amateur sporting associations in the world. The county is particularly associated with the 3,000 year old game of Hurling, which today still attracts an 80,000 plus attendance and a global TV audience for its national showpiece, the All-Ireland final. With over 70 clubs, in Tipperary, the GAA also promotes Gaelic Football – its most played sport and one Tipperary also excels at – as well as Handball, Rounders, Ladies Football and Camogie (similar to hurling but played only by women). The Association also promotes traditional Irish music, song and dance.

Tipperary is internationally famous for another sport of giants – horse racing, the ‘sport of kings’. With trainers based throughout the county, its most famous stable of all is Ballydoyle, which was founded by one of the sport’s greatest ever trainers and winner of multiple classics Vincent O’Brien. His stud has been taken over by the equally incomparable Aidan O’Brien. The county also has a global status for breeding, with Coolmore Stud the largest exporter of thoroughbred horses in the world.

And there’s more; with a strong tradition in rugby and soccer, boasting internationals in both codes today as well as greyhound racing, athletics, golf, angling, mountain biking, road cycling, etc.

Mountains, lakes and heritage

Tipperary is a treasure waiting to be explored. From its stunning mountains and rolling hills to the breathtaking Lough Derg – Ireland’s second largest lake – and the majestic River Suir, the sixth largest county on the island of Ireland is the proverbial playground for those who like to explore the outdoors. Part of Ireland’s Ancient East and a gateway to the Wild Atlantic Way, it is steeped in history, with remnants of medieval Ireland across the county, including the world-famous Rock of Cashel, sitting imperiously in the centre of the county and a constant motif for the storied history of Tipperary. With a proud deference to the past, Tipperary still offers all the amenities of a county very much living in the present and bolting for the future. Modern facilities include quality parkland golf courses, angling, kayaking and other water based amenities, retail parks, cinemas, award winning hotels, and restaurants that celebrate the bounty of arguably Ireland’s richest agricultural heartland. There’s the charm of the county’s large market towns or its necklace of quaint, postcard villages. Tipperary also boasts some of the country’s leading artisan food producers, farmers markets and festivals all certain to appeal to the culturally curious visitor and local resident alike.

Clodagh Cavanagh
Abbey Machinery

 Tipperary offers that work-life balance that we all strive for. You can finish up work at 5/5.30, you’re home in 10 minutes and doing what you need to do with your family.

Conor Russell
Boston Scientific

We have a fantastic quality of life, great schooling, great communities and very affordable housing here.

Gearóid McDermott
Amneal Ireland Ltd.

The cost of accommodation here is very reasonable and definitely the cost of purchasing houses is very reasonable. That’s been a wonderful advantage for people.